Pride of Place was a multimedia project of photographs, backed by video based on interviews with some 50 residents of Sheriff Street, by Maria McGrane.

A psychotherapist, for Maria the listening started early, asking neighbours if Mrs. Ryan was on the mend as they picked up her Lyons Green Blend in ‘Mattie’s’ their family shop, which doubled as an unofficial community centre. Mattie’s shop was teeming with the hustle and bustle of community life. Acting as an emporium of sweetie-ness for children, an essential goods provider for families, and a place where family triumphs and traumas got shared. The shop felt like a community centre. Sheriff Street is rich in community spirit rooted in generations past that remarkably endures today.

Her memories were of kind, resilient people who cared for each other, at odds with the tabloid and TV version of life there so Maria and colleague Linda Hanlon decided to research the real story. Interspersed with happiness there was pain, recollections of neighbourhoods sliding from full employment into scarred, scared streets, life-changing injuries from jobs coldly unforgiving of the slightest error, eternal children drowned playing off Spenser Dock.

This contrasts with the portraits of artist Tara Kearns and Olympic boxer Emmet Brennan their hope, built on that extra hard work that she says always defines such neighborhoods.

It was a wonderful exhibition!!. Thanks to everyone who attended it, and special thanks to
@chqdublin
@neic_dublin
@dublincitycouncil
@linda.hanlon.330
And to all the great community of Sheriff Street!